Ranged Complications

  • Aiming: A character who spends time aiming can shoot much more accurately than one who simply snaps off a shot. However, aiming properly requires that the character is not moving faster than a slow walk and that the target stays in the character’s field of vision the whole time.
    For every turn spent aiming, the player adds one to her Dexterity + Firearms pool, up to a maximum of the character’s Perception rating. A scope will add two additional dice to the pool. This bonus applies to only one shot at a time, though. A character with a scope and a Perception rating of 3 could spend three turns aiming and get an additional five dice to the roll (two for the scope and three for aiming). To get the bonus again, he must spend another three turns aiming.
    A character must have Firearms 1 to receive this benefit.
  • Automatic Fire: Some firearms allow the user to empty an entire clip in a matter of seconds. Firing a gun on full-auto adds 10 dice to the attack roll, but doing so raises the difficulty by two as the recoil throws the character’s aim off. This attack is permissible only if the clip is at least half full to begin with. After this attack, of course, the clip is completely empty.
    A character may also choose to spray an area instead of emptying a clip at one target. The system is the same as for fully automatic fire, except that successes are distributed evenly among all targets. If the character fires at are more targets than the player rolls successes, the Storyteller chooses which targets are hit.
  • Bows: While werewolves tend to see guns as jerky, graceless, Weaver-tools, many tribes use bows in combat and make them into fetishes. Using a bow requires the character to purchase the Archery Skill (a secondary Skill). The player rolls Dexterity + Archery to fire a bow; difficulties for various types of bows are listed on the Ranged Weapons chart. A player whose character does not have the Archery Skill may roll Dexterity + Athletics, but every such roll has a + 1 difficulty penalty.
    At close range, an arrow from a short bow hits as hard as a small caliber bullet, and bows are silent, so their combat potential is obvious. Another common use for bows is driving a sharp wooden shaft into a vampire’s heart. To do so, the player must roll five successes to hit the heart, and at least three health levels of damage must be inflicted after soak.
    Bows, however, have two main problems. One is that it takes an action (automatic) to nock and draw an arrow, whereas it takes two automatic actions to reload a crossbow. The other problem is that if the player botches the attack roll, the bowstring snaps. If the character happens to have a spare bowstring, he can repair the bow with a Wits + Archery roll (or a Wits + Crafts roll with a + 1 difficulty penalty). If not, the bow is just a stick until the character replaces the string.
  • Cover: When you’re the only one with a gun, it is acceptable to stand in plain sight and fire. When engaged in a true firefight, however, finding cover is an intelligent idea. Cover impedes an opponent’s attempts to shoot at a character, but it also impedes that character’s ability to return fire. Basic cover types and the modifiers they impose on an attacker’s difficulty follow. These modifiers are also imposed on return fire, albeit to a lesser degree. A character returning fire subtracts one from these modifiers. Therefore, a character returning fire from behind a wall adds one to his difficulty, while a character lying prone suffers no impediment.
Cover Difficulty
Lying Flat + 1
Behind Wall + 2
Only Head exposed + 3
  • Movement: Shooting at a target that is moving faster than a walk, or while moving faster than a walk oneself, raises the difficulty by one.
  • Multiple Shots: A player must take a multiple action or spend Rage to fire multiple shots in a turn. Three-round bursts and automatic fire each count as one “shot” for this purpose. The maximum number of shots that may be fired per turn is equal to the gun’s rate of fire (listed on the chart).
  • Range: Each weapon on the Ranged Weapons chart has a range listed for it. This distance is the weapon’s medium range; the difficulty is considered 6 within this range. A weapon may be fired at a target twice as far away, but doing so raises the difficulty to 8. If the target is within two yards, however, the range is considered point-blank, and the difficulty drops to 4.
  • Reloading: A gun that takes a clip can be reloaded quickly in combat, assuming that the character has a spare clip ready. The gun can be reloaded and fire in the same turn. The player simply loses two dice from her attack pool to make up for the time spent reloading.
    A revolver can be reloaded thus only with a speedloader. If the character must reload a revolver manually, doing so takes the full turn and her complete concentration, but it may be performed without a roll if the character has at least one dot in Firearms. Reloading a clip, (actually putting bullets into the clip) however, requires a Dexterity + Firearms roll (difficulty 6). Only one success is necessary, but doing so takes the entire turn.
  • Targeting: Aiming for a specific area (the head, the hand, the chest) raises the difficulty by two. Any special effects such a shot has are up to the Storyteller.
  • Three-Round Burst: Some weapons are capable of firing three bullets every time the character pulls the trigger. Doing so in combat adds three dice to the attack roll, but it raises the difficulty by one. Obviously, firing at this rate also empties three bullets from the clip. See the Ranged Weapons chart for which guns are capable of firing a three-round burst.
  • Thrown Weapon: While the Garou Nation frowns upon the use of guns, thrown weapons are a part of almost every culture. From the Asian shuriken to the Indian chakram to the Australian boomerang — and even including found objects such as rocks and small vehicles—some Garou prefer to soften up their opposition with such attacks before charging into the fray. The roll to use a thrown weapon is Dexterity + Athletics, not Melee. The difficulty is usually 6, depending on the size and distance of the target. If the weapon being used is not meant to be thrown (most knives meant for use in close combat are not balanced for throwing, and vice versa) the Storyteller should increase the difficulty by at least one. Damage ratings for such weapons can be found on the Thrown Weapons chart.
    The range at which a weapon can be thrown accurately and with enough force to do any damage depends on the weight of the weapon and the strength of the thrower. The Storyteller may choose to modify both difficulty and damage dice if she feels that character is outside of the weapon’s effective range.

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Ranged Complications

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