Turn Sequence

Action Scene

  • Describe Stage: You should begin each turn by describing the scene from the characters’ point of view. Try to give some hint of what opponents or Storyteller-controlled characters in the scene might be about to do, but don’t give away any information to which the characters would not be privy. This stage is also the one in which you should recap what happened in the last turn, if applicable. Remind the players what they and their characters’ opponents attempted, whether they were successful and who is still standing. Don’t be afraid to repeat something several times over the course of a scene. Constant updates will prevent you and the players from becoming confused.
    Once you have described the scene, allow the players to ask questions. Use common sense, though. A player might well ask for a clarification in someone’s description (“He’s carrying a falchion? What is that, anyway?”), because the player has a right to know and understand what her character perceives. A player cannot legitimately ask for information her character doesn’t have, however. “Is the guy with the falchion a vampire?” is not a legitimate question unless the character has some way of finding out.
  • Initiative Stage: When you and the players feel satisfied with the scene’s description, each player must roll for initiative. Roll one die and add it to the character’s initiative rating (Dexterity + Wits). The Storyteller must determine initiative for each of the characters she controls as well. The character with the highest initiative acts first. In case of a tie, the character with the higher initiative rating acts first. If the ratings are equal, the characters act simu1taneously.
    If opponents take the characters by surprise, the Storyteller may deduct from the characters’ initiative ratings to give their opponents an edge (and vice versa as necessary). If the characters or opponents are surprised they use only their Initiative rating (Dexterity + Wits). They don’t add the additional die
    During situations in which initiative is less important, the Storyteller may call for declaration of actions in order of Wits scores.
  • Decision Stage: Each player declares what her character will do, going in descending order of initiative. The characters with the highest initiative rolls act first, but declare last, giving them the chance to base their actions on those of the slower characters. This phase is also the one in which Rage expenditures are declared. During this stage, the Storyteller should decide what kind of roll is required for the action in question.
  • Resolution Stage: Beginning with the highest initiative, each player makes whatever rolls are necessary to take her character’s action. After determining how successful each action is, the Storyteller must translate the dice rolls into description and plot. For example, if a player manages a miraculous damage roll and kills her opponent in one swipe, don’t simply say, “That was seven health levels, huh? Nope, he couldn’t soak it. That’s his ass, I guess.” Get descriptive. Make the player feel as though his character has really won a brutal fight. “Your massive paw slams into the side of his head, tearing away most of his face. You hear a muddied, wet snap from his neck, and his corpse crashes to the ground in front of you.”

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Turn Sequence

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